Latest Info

Candidate Training February 27

#runforsomething: MultDems Candidate Training February 27th

Your community needs you! Are you ready to take the leap and run for elected office? School board and other positions are coming up in the May Election and MultDems want to help you get started. Democracy runs on our representation and involvement! Those who hold these positions make a difference now. They are also building experience for future endeavors.

Join the MultDems Candidate Training Saturday February 27, 12-4 pm via Zoom.

Sign up for the event!

This four hour class will get you started on your campaign. Working with experienced candidates who have a few campaigns under their belt, you will learn about messaging, campaign planning, and voter outreach.

You will also learn how to use the Democrat’s VAN application to reach out and connect with voters through phone banks, canvassing, and get out the vote projects.

We are ready to empower Democrats in our communities! And we can help you be ready to win!

What: Multnomah Democrats Candidate Training

When: Saturday February 27, 12-4pm

Sign up now to reserve your spot!

Sign up for the event!

Black Leadership in Oregon History

During Black History Month, it’s good to reflect on just a few of the many leaders of color, who have worked hard for equity and inclusion and helped make Oregon a better place. This month, Multnomah County Democrats want to honor people who blazed trails and worked with many others to bring change to our state.

Avel Gordley

Avel Louise Gordly is an activist, community organizer, and former politician in Oregon, who in 1996 became the first African-American woman to be elected to the Oregon State Senate. She served in the Senate from 1997 to 2009. Previously, she served for five years in the Oregon House of Representatives.

After five years at Pacific Northwest Bell, she enrolled at Portland State University, earning a degree in the administration of justice.[1] Though an avid reader, it was not until her time at Portland State University that she was first exposed to African American literature and noted how she had not been exposed to this during her time in the public school system.[2]During her time at PSU she also applied to participate with Operations Crossroads Africa and was accepted, sending her to West Africa with most of her time spent in a small village in Nigeria, all of which would go on to be a life-changing experience.[2] In 1974, she became the first person in her family to graduate from college.[2] After graduating, Gordly began working with the State of Oregon Corrections Division as a counselor in a work release facility for women where she noticed racial bias that led to work release for black women and education release for white women. [3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avel_Gordly

Willie Beatrice Barrow (née Taplin; December 7, 1924 – March 12, 2015) was an American civil rights activist and minister. Barrow was the co-founder of Operation PUSH, which was named Operation Breadbasket at the time of its creation alongside Rev. Jesse Jackson. In 1984, Barrow became the first woman executive director of a civil rights organization, serving as Push’s CEO. Barrow was the godmother of President Barack Obama.[5]

When she was 12, she organized a demonstration with fellow students to protest that white students were allowed to ride the bus, but black students had to walk to school. Barrow confronted the bus driver and demanded that he let her fellow students ride.[6] When the bus driver confronted her about it she said “Y’all can kill me if you want to. But I’m tired.”[7] When Barrow turned 16, she moved to Portland, Oregon, to study at the Warner Pacific Theological Seminary (now Warner Pacific College). While still a student, Barrow and a group of black residents helped build one of the first black Churches of God in the city; she was ordained as a minister after graduation.[8] She started working as a welder during World War II at the Kaiser Shipyards in Swan Island, Washington, where she met Clyde Barrow, whom she married in 1945 in Washington state.[9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Barrow

Willie Barrow

Beatrice Morrow Cannady (January 9, 1890 – August 19, 1974)[1] was a renowned civil rights advocate in early 20th-century Oregon, United States. She was editor of the Advocate, the state’s largest African-American newspaper.[2] She was also co-founder and vice president of the Portland, Oregon chapter of the NAACP.[3][4]

Upon moving to Portland, Cannady became associate editor of The Advocate.[6] Her work through the newspaper drew attention to racial violence during the early 1920s and prompted a statement from Governor Ben W. Olcott decrying the actions of the Ku Klux Klan, which was spreading through Oregon at the time.

In addition to her editorial work, Cannady helped to establish the Portland chapter of the NAACP in 1913. This organization marked the first such branch of the organization formed west of the Mississippi River[7] and continues to actively participate in the Portland community. Acting as the chapter’s secretary, Cannady worked with the group to remove racist, exclusionary language from Oregon’s constitution, a mission which succeeded in 1926 and 1927 when the changes were ratified.[8] Cannady also led protests against Ku Klux Klan propaganda film The Birth of a Nation.[2]

Cannady graduated from Northwestern College of Law in 1922, making her the first black woman to graduate from law school in Oregon.[9] She went on to become the first black woman to practice law in Oregon.[10] A Republican, she was the first black woman to run for state representative.[9] Cannady successfully advocated for the passage of civil rights bills by the Oregon state legislature. Her efforts helped integrate public schools in Longview, Washington and Vernonia, Oregon.[2]

In 1927, Cannady represented Oregon at the 4th annual Pan-African Congress in New York City.[11]

William Arthur Hilliard (May 28, 1927 – January 16, 2017) was an American journalist. He was editor of The Oregonian, the major daily newspaper in Portland, Oregon, from 1987 to 1994 and was that newspaper’s first African-American editor. He was also president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors in 1993–94.

As a youth, he applied for a job as a newspaper delivery boy for The Oregonian, but his application was rejected out of concerns that having a black delivery boy would not be acceptable to the paper’s white subscribers.[2][4] He graduated from Benson Polytechnic High School, where he had worked on the school newspaper, and spent a year in the U.S. Navy after being drafted at the end of the Second World War.[3]

Hilliard worked at The Oregonian from 1952 to 1994, starting as a copy boy, and then rising to clerk, sports reporter, religion and general assignment reporter, and in 1965 assistant city editor. In 1971, he became city editor, and in 1982 was named executive editor.[4] He oversaw the merging of the paper with the Oregon Journal in 1982.[4] His first big story was the Holt Korean Babylift in 1956. When he was named city editor it was considered national news, warranting an article in Time Magazine. In 1980 he served as one of four panelists in the nationally televised debates between President Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.[1]

In 1987, Hilliard was named editor of The Oregonian, with “full control over the newspaper’s news and editorial departments.”[2] He was the newspaper’s first African-American editor.[4] He introduced zoned suburban coverage and expanded coverage of minorities issues, as well as increasing the hiring of minorities by the paper. While he was editor two staffers complained to him about how the nicknames of sports teams were demeaning to Native Americans. Under Hilliard’s leadership The Oregonian stopped using demeaning sports nicknames in 1992, and the newspaper also stopped identifying people by race in crime stories unless absolutely necessary.[1]

Hilliard served as president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) in 1993–94,[4] the first African-American to be elected to that position.[1] In 1993, he was given the President’s Award of the National Association of Black Journalists, which called him a role model.[1] He remained editor of The Oregonian until retiring in 1994,[4] although during the last year of his tenure with the paper he gave his designated successor, executive editor Sandra M. Rowe, effective control of the editor’s duties and focused his attention on ASNE duties.[3]

In 1998, Hilliard was given the Oregon Newspaper Hall of Fame Award by the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.[7]

In 2002, when it was discovered that USA Today reporter Jack Kelley had fabricated some of his stories, USA Today turned to Hilliard, along with veteran editors John Seigenthaler Sr. and Bill Kovach, to monitor the investigation.[8]

William “Bill” McCoy (June 11, 1921 – April 1996), was an American politician from Oregon. In 1972, he was the first African American elected to the Oregon State Legislature. After serving one term in the Oregon House of Representatives, he was appointed to serve in the Oregon Senate. In the next election he was elected to the same seat and served until his death in 1996. His senate district covered North Portland and much of Northeast Portland.[1] He was a Democrat.

One of McCoy’s first actions after being elected to the Oregon legislature was to introduce House Resolution 13, ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which Oregon had never formally ratified after rescinding a previous ratification.[3]

McCoy Park in Portland is named for Bill McCoy and his wife Gladys, who became the first black member of the Portland school board in 1970, and the first black Multnomah County commissioner in 1979.[4]

The Dream, a sculpture of Martin Luther King Jr. in Portland, is dedicated to Bill and Gladys McCoy.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_McCoy_(Oregon_politician)

Bill McCoy

Legislative Action Alert

Legislative Action Alert | And How You Can Track What is Happening in Salem

Three bills are wending their way through the statehouse right now, all of which are worthy of attention:

  • SB 683: This senate bill will help students understand the unique contributions of African Americans in this state and country.
  • HB 2168: African Americans have been celebrating Juneteenth for well over a century. Declaring it a legal state holiday is a step in the right direction. 
  • SJM 4: Reparations for African Americans are 155 years past due.
  • HB 2002: Converts mandatory minimum sentences for specified felonies other than murder to presumptive sentences.

To view and track current legislation in the Oregon House and Senate, learn to navigate OLIS (Oregon Legislative Information System) in 60 seconds with Rep. Dacia Grayber by Clicking Here.

Re-Org 2021: Election Results

Highlights

On January 23rd, 2021, MultDem PCPs elected 7 officers, 21 SCC Delegates and Alternates, and 23 CD Delegates and Alternates.

The Multnomah County Democrats 2021 Reorganization Meeting took place on Saturday, January 23rd. Thank you, to all those PCPs who stuck with us through a very long Zoom meeting! For information on the duties of Officers, SCC Delegates, and CD Delegates, please consult the Party Bylaws at https://multdems.org/bylaws

Officers

These are the people who operate your all-volunteer, grassroots party. As per the bylaws, the roles are

  • Chair: Julio Castilleja
  • Vice Chair 1: Marcia Schneider
  • Vice Chair 2: Lisa Morrison
  • Treasurer: Dean Price
  • Recording Secretary: Adam “Patch” Perryman
  • Communications Officer: James “Jas” Davis
  • Technology Officer: Aaron Levine

State Central Committee

MultDems also send representatives to the State Central Committee (SCC) of the DPO. These representatives manage organization and policy initiatives for the Democratic Party of Oregon (DPO).

DELEGATES
FEMALEMALE
Marcia SchneiderJuilo Castilleja
Shani Harris-BagwellLurelle Robbins
Shirley MinorMichael C. Smith
Catherine ThomassonSpencer Trumm
Sara WolkBrandon Zero
Jil HeimensenQuinton Blanton
Ami FoxBing Wong
Mary SchuttenHenry Exerjian
Cindy SmithKavan Bahrami
Leslie MasonMichael A Burch
Sucheta Bal
ALTERNATES
John Harris Knight
Debbie GordonJoel Barker
Layla AssemJames “Jas” Davis
Sally JoughinJason Ali Allen
Lisa WolfJack Hanna
Faith E RuffingGary Lietke
Adrienne EnghouseGraham Parks
Molly McGuireMike Radway
Robin StevensDaniel Goetz
Lydia FahsMoses Ross
Mary V. RarickJesse Cornett

Congressional District Delegates

We elected Congressional District Delegates to CD 1, CD 3, and CD 5. Our Congressional Districts are our conduit for our Congressional Representatives and for their constituents.

1st Congressional District Delegates

DELEGATES
FEMALEMALE
Cindy SmithLurelle Robbins
Matt Laas
ALTERNATES
Kathy Jackson
Rose Etta VennetucciJJ Jackson

3rd Congressional District Delegates

DELEGATES
FEMALEMALE
Shani Harris-BagwellKyle Huth
Shirley MinorQuinton Blanton
Leigha LaFleurSpencer Trumm
Sucheta BalHenry Exerjian
Kate FlanaganBing Wong
Leslie MasonKavan Bahrami
Debby SchwartzJesse Cornett
Faith E RuffingMichael A Burch
Adrienne EnghouseTracy Farwell
ALTERNATES
Molly McGuireJohn Vandermosten
Kori BrooksMike Radway
Mary V RarickBrad Baker
Emilie E Saks-WebbBob Tackett
Roseta AkinMoses Ross
Kathleen TurnerKevin Fitts
Alice ShapiroMoshe Lenske
Sara SafdieKevin Weitmier
Maureen RayTim Rowan

5th Congressional District Delegates

DELEGATES
Andrea Salinas
Vaughn Emmons
ALTERNATES
Christian Ramey
Deanna Cohen
Biden-Harris Inauguration Zoom Party

Join MultDems for Inauguration Day!

8:30am Pacific Time, Tuesday January 20th. The moment we have all been working for. Let’s witness history together.

Multnomah Democrats are hosting a Zoom gathering to celebrate this auspicious moment, the peaceful transfer of power to our new President Biden and Vice President Harris!

Join us, virtually of course, on Zoom as our new leaders take the oath of office. We know that you worked hard for this moment and want to share the joy together!

8:30 to 10:30 AM Wednesday January 20th!

Click here to join!

January Central Committee: December 14, 2021 Zoom Meeting for PCPs

January 2021 Central Committee: Thursday the 14th.

NOTE: The deadline to submit your nomination for Chair, Vice Chair 1 (training), Vice Chair 2 (credentialing), Secretary, Treasurer, Communications Officer and Technology Officer is Saturday, January 9th, 2021 at 8 PM

Any Democrat living in Multnomah County may run!

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County Central Committee meets

Thursday, January 14, 2021

ONLINE ZOOM Meeting

RSVP HERE for details

Zoom opens at 6:30 for credentialing – The meeting begins at 7.

The meeting is open to members of the Central Committee (PCP’s)

You must RSVP in advance.

Our Central Committee Meeting schedule is as follows:

6:30 PM Registration and sign in to be credentialed. You may in the waiting area for awhile as credentialing occurs

7:00 PM Business Meeting

  • District Attorney Mike Schmidt
  • Statements and Comments from outgoing Admin officers.
  • Meet the candidates for Office and Delegate positions of The Democratic Party of Multnomah County
  • Review the Process for the Organization Meeting.

    PCP Appointments.  Meet the candidates up for appointment to fill PCP vacancies.

9:00 PM Scheduled end of Business Meeting

Register, in advance, for the CC meeting here

The CC working agenda

NOTE the Organization Meeting will be Jan 23, 2021

You can learn more and RSVP for that Zoom meeting now: https://lead.multdems.org.

IHere in Multnomah County our election work helped make BIG WINS in Georgia possible.   This is momentous; we are freed from “do nothing for the people” Mitch McConnell. 

$2000 NOW – The calls are coming in across the country for $2000 NOW.  It is a message and a need that resonates with Democrats and Republicans as “The People” deserve their dividends on the investments made over the past 40 years in the billionaire class.  Support our Representatives Bonamici and Blumenauer in CALLING for $2000 Now. And Call out Kurt Schrader for being one of only 2 Democrats to vote against a one time $2000 investment in the people and the economy.  Let us rebuild the economy from the ground up by supporting the Senate bill sponsored by Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, and Senators Bernie Sanders and Ed Markey and the House Bill by Rep. Tim Ryan, Ro Kannah with co-sponsors Reps. Blumenauer and Bonamici  https://multdems.org/2000now

Precinct Committee Persons are The Central Committee 

There are vacant PCP positions across the county. Invite Democrats to join us! Apply to fill vacant positions here.

Monthly Donations keep the party solvent and functioning.

Monthly donations to the Party support all the things we do to work locally for our communities.

Volunteers are the backbone of all we do.

Get involved: email volunteer@multdems.org

Thank you for everything you do.

Sincerely,

Lurelle Robbins, Chair

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County

Reorg Election January 2021multdems.org/reorg2021

Announcing Re-Org 2021: Election of your Democratic Party representation

Highlights

PCPs: You will get a snail mail USPS letter soon to confirm your email address so that you can be credentialed for the very important reorganization election January 23rd, held via Zoom. We must have a correct email for you by January 12th for you to participate.

All Multnomah Democrats: Elections on January 23rd will decide your leadership and representation in the county and state parties. 

Declarations are due JANUARY 9 at 8:00 PM. For information on the duties of Officers, SCC Delegates, and CD Delegates, please consult the Party Bylaws at https://multdems.org/bylaws

Be excited!

The Multnomah County Democrats 2021 Reorganization Meeting is coming up on January 23rd. 

Why should I be excited? What does this have to do with me?

Every two years the Democrats of Multnomah County, represented by precinct committee persons (PCPs), vote on who holds important roles in the organization. These people represent you and serve the party at the local and state level. These jobs have a huge impact on our issues, our candidates, and our success as a party.

What happens at this meeting?

This year, it is via Zoom. If you are a PCP, you get credentialed and join the meeting. More details will be mailed to you. We have two series of votes:

We vote for the Democratic Party of Multnomah County Administration Officers

These are the people who operate your all-volunteer, grassroots party. As per the bylaws, the roles are

  • Chair
  • Vice Chair 1 (PCP Training)
  • Vice Chair 2 (Credentialing)
  • Secretary
  • Treasurer
  • Communications Officer
  • Technology Officer

Those eligible to vote are elected PCPs (not those appointed by the Central Committee).

Who can run and be elected to these positions?

Not just PCPs are eligible: Any Democrat who has been registered for 180 days in Multnomah County can run and serve.

What do I have to do to run?

Soon, an online and printed form will be available. As soon as you fill that out, the Re-org team will put your candidacy up on the MultDems website. At the reorg meeting, you can speak or present a short video. Then, PCPs will vote.

What about the State Central Committee?

Then, we vote for State Central Committee and Congressional District Delegates

MultDems also send representatives to the State Central Committee (SCC) of the DPO. These representatives manage organization and policy initiatives for the Democratic Party of Oregon (DPO).

Oooh. That sounds cool. How do we elect those people?

The SCC members are elected by PCPs both elected and appointed, so some who could not vote in the County Admin vote can vote for SCC.

In addition, we will elect Congressional District Delegates. Our Congressional Districts (Such as CD 3, represented by Earl Blumenauer or CD 1, represented by Susan Bonamici) are our conduit for these representatives and for their constituents. The voters for these roles are a subset of the total county, so the elections will be held in break out rooms or similar.

What is the next step?

If you are running, start campaigning! If you are a PCP eligible to vote, put January 23rd on your calendar. You have important work to do!

Thanks and stay tuned!

Important dates to know

  • December 26:
    • Web and Paper forms made available for Officer Candidate Declarations
    • Web form made available for Delegate Candidate Declarations
    • First notice of meeting snail-mailed to PCPs
  • January 2: First notice of meeting emailed out to PCPs
  • January 9, 8pm: Officer and Delegate Candidate Declarations due
  • January 9, midnight: Officer Candidate Information emailed out to elected PCPs
  • January 12, midnight: PCP Email Address Corrections Due
  • January 13: Second Notice emailed to PCPs
  • Saturday January 16: Zoom Training Session 1
  • Saturday January 17: Zoom Training Session 2
  • 23rd January, noon: Reorganization Meeting for Multnomah Democrats 2021
  • January 25, before noon: New MultDems Officers inform DPO and County Elections Office of election results
December Central Committee Meeting

December 2020 Central Committee

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County Central Committee meets

Thursday, December 10, 2020

ONLINE ZOOM Meeting

RSVP HERE for details

Zoom opens at 6:30 for credentialing – The meeting begins at 7.

The meeting is open to members of the Central Committee (PCP’s)

You must RSVP in advance.

Our Central Committee Meeting schedule is as follows:

6:30 PM Registration and sign in to be credentialed. You may in the waiting area for awhile as credentialing occurs

7:00 PM Business Meeting

  • Meet the Candidates running for DNC Delegate positions
  • Review the Process for the Organization Meeting, our bi-annual election of officers and state party representatives.
  • Consider becoming involved as an officer or SCC or CD delegate
  • NOTE the Organization Meeting will be Jan 23, 2021
  • Support for DA Mike Schmidt see resolution passed at November CC.

SCC alternate vacancy – to be filled. Female or non-binary opening. You may self nominate or nominate another. We will vote to appoint.

PCP Appointments. Meet thecandidates up for appointment to fill PCP vacancies.

9:00 PM Scheduled end of Business Meeting

Register, in advance, for the CC meeting here.

The CC working agenda

Act Now – election work in Georgia https://multdems/2020hub

$2000 NOW – Support our Representatives Bonamici and Blumenauer in CALLING for $2000 Now. Rebuild the economy from the ground up by supporting the Senate bill sponsored by Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, and Senators Bernie Sanders and Ed Markey and the House Bill by Rep. Tim Ryan, Ro Kannah and co-sponsored by Reps. Blumenauer and Bonamici https://multdems.org/2000now

Precinct Committee Persons are The Central Committee

There remain vacant PCP positions across the county. Invite Democrats to join us! Apply to fill vacant positions here.

Monthly donations to the Party support all the things we do to work locally for our communities.

Get more involved: email volunteer@multdems.org

Thank you for everything you do.

Sincerely,

Lurelle Robbins, Chair

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County

chair@multdems.org

Multnomah Democrats support District Attorney Mike Schmidt focusing resources on crimes not protests

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County supports the policies put forth by Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt to focus on serious crimes and better outcomes for communities rather than to squelch the First Amendment rights of our neighbors.

Read the Multnomah Democrats November 12, 2020 resolution, “2020-17 Supporting Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt’s Policy to not prosecute non-violent protesters.

On August 11, 2020, District Attorney Schmidt released a policy stating that his office would presumptively decline to prosecute cases stemming from the protests that did not involve deliberate property damage, theft, or the use or threat of force against another person. This action stands in contrast to the indiscriminate proliferation of charges brought against otherwise peaceful protesters ranging from “interfering with a peace officer,” “rioting,” and “disorderly conduct.”

We do not condone violence and vandalism. That position is not in conflict with our opposition to Portland Police Bureau (PPB) efforts to prevent residents from exercising their First Amendment right to free speech, specifically in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Over the last six months, in the face of a global pandemic and statewide wildfires, our families, friends, and neighbors have taken to the streets in marches coursing over our city’s bridges, and rallies in our streets. They are using our shared right to freedom of speech, a tradition our nation holds dear. It is the right of every American to make their voice heard when they see injustice.

The PPB has routinely deployed tear gas, batons, and rubber bullets at protests. They use techniques known as “bull rushes” to disperse crowds, relentlessly and indiscriminately pursuing them through Portland streets. They have assaulted protesters, legal observers, media, and medics. They have caused injuries and trauma.

We believe that District Attorney Schmidt’s stance is refreshing new leadership that centers our justice system on improving communities. The policy adopted by District Attorney Schmidt acts in alignment with our platform and aspires to the words of America’s founding documents.

We support Schmidt’s policy’s effect of guiding the District Attorney’s Office to prosecute those who did act with malicious intent. Damage to people and property hurts our community. People have the right to be free from government overreach. Police and prosecutors should be focused on increasing personal safety for the entire community, not staunching free speech.

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt’s new approach to fair prosecutions is the right policy in a time when the voters of Portland have made it clear, with over 80% of the vote, that they want police accountability and police reform.

Thank you, District Attorney Schmidt.

Young boy enthusiastically cheering while standing on a stadium seat.

2020 Election: Celebration and Gratitude

In Multnomah County, you, our local Democrats, our volunteers and our donors have inspired me and inspired all of us.

From our committee leaders and committee members who do the behind the scenes work to the District Leaders, PCP’s, Neighborhood Leaders and all of you who have engaged with the Election Hub; we have done so much.

67,765! That’s how many more Multnomah county residents voted for Joe Biden this year than voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016! More of you came out to vote Dem this year than in 2012 and 2008. Your vote will help counter any fictitious claim, and demonstrate that nationally U.S. voters absolutely preferred Joe & Kamala. Thank you for responding to our appeal to build the popular vote total!

You picked up and displayed yard signs, made cookies, and wrote countless letters, postcards, and texts. All that writing, I wager your fingers are likely blue! Locally, we joined together and distributed over 90,000 door hangers. and.we.voted.

You can see the results here in our region immediately. Pre-school for all. Drug policy that is built to heal, not harm. Peter Defazio returning to the House of Representatives. A great new, diverse batch of Democrats heading to the state legislature. Our new Secretary of State Shemia Fagan. This is your election, you left your mark. Thank you.

Be proud of all WE have done. Take a breath knowing that together, we rise. Together, we did what we needed to do.

Of course – once the election results are finalized, we will all be called upon to continue our work to envision and demand a world designed by and for the people. Voting is just part of the story. Our elected leaders need our support and our communities need us to speak up for them. We have seen what happens when Democracy is not attended to. Never again.

With the country so obviously divided, it is obvious that we need a progressive vision. We have more joyful work to do.

Will you be ready? Join us.

From your admin team, committee chairs, and district leaders, thank you from the bottom or our hearts,

Lurelle Robbins, Chair

The Democratic Party of Multnomah County